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Clin Neurophysiol. 2013 Jul;124(7):1470-6. doi: 10.1016/j.clinph.2013.02.009. Epub 2013 Apr 20.

Amplitude reduction in brainstem auditory response in term infants under neonatal intensive care.

Author information

  • 1Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China. jiangzedong-oxshang@hotmail.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine brainstem auditory electrophysiology in term neonates under intensive care due to perinatal conditions other than hypoxia-ischemia.

METHODS:

Maximum length sequence brainstem auditory evoked response was studied in term neonates in an intensive care unit. The amplitudes of wave components of the response were analysed to assess brainstem auditory electrophysiology.

RESULTS:

The amplitudes of all wave components in the neonates under intensive care tended to be smaller than in those in normal term controls. Wave I amplitude was significantly reduced at all 91-910/s clicks (p < 0.05-0.01). The amplitudes of waves III and V were also reduced, respectively, at 227-910/s (all p < 0.05) and at 455 and 910/s (both p < 0.01). The amplitude reduction was slightly more significant at higher than lower click rates, but there were no significant differences in the slopes of wave I, III and V amplitude-rate functions between the neonates under intensive care and the controls.

CONCLUSIONS:

Wave amplitudes of maximum length sequence brainstem auditory evoked response were reduced in term neonates under intensive care due to perinatal conditions other than hypoxia-ischemia.

SIGNIFICANCE:

Brainstem auditory electrophysiology is depressed in term neonates under intensive care, possibly due to collective adverse effects of perinatal conditions. The impairment to the neonatal, particularly rostral, brainstem due to other perinatal conditions is less severe than that due to hypoxia-ischemia previously reported.

Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
23608697
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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