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Int J Epidemiol. 2014 Jun;43(3):691-702. doi: 10.1093/ije/dyt010. Epub 2013 Apr 18.

Cohort profile: Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC).

Author information

  • 1School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR_S 943, F-75013, Paris, France; INSERM, UMR_S 943, F-75013, Paris, France; AP-HP, Hôpital Pitié-Salpétrière, Service des maladies infectieuses et tropicales, F-75013, Paris, France, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA, VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT, USA, Academisch Medisch Centrum bij de Universiteit van Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, University Hospital Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland, Clinic of Infectious Diseases & Tropical Medicine, San Paolo Hospital, University of Milan, Italy, Centre d'Estudis Epidemiològics sobre ITS/VIH/SIDA de Catalunya, Badalona, Spain, Division of Epidemiology and Population Health, British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, Vancouver, Canada, Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, Canada, Research Department of Infection and Population Health, UCL Medical School, London, UK, INSERM U.897, ISPED, Université Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France, Department of Internal Medicine University of Cologne, DE, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USA, National Epidemiology Center. Carlos III Health Institute, Madrid, Spain, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, USA, Division of Infectious Disease, Department of Medicine, University of Alabama, Birmingham, USA, HIV Atlanta VA Cohort Study (HAVACS), Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Decatur, GA, USA and Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität, HIVCENTER, Frankfurt, Germany m.t.may@bristol.ac.uk.
  • 2School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR_S 943, F-75013, Paris, France; INSERM, UMR_S 943, F-75013, Paris, France; AP-HP, Hôpital Pitié-Salpétrière, Service des maladies infectieuses et tropicales, F-75013, Paris, France, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA, VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT, USA, Academisch Medisch Centrum bij de Universiteit van Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, University Hospital Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland, Clinic of Infectious Diseases & Tropical Medicine, San Paolo Hospital, University of Milan, Italy, Centre d'Estudis Epidemiològics sobre ITS/VIH/SIDA de Catalunya, Badalona, Spain, Division of Epidemiology and Population Health, British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, Vancouver, Canada, Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, Canada, Research Department of Infection and Population Health, UCL Medical School, London, UK, INSERM U.897, ISPED, Université Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France, Department of Internal Medicine University of Cologne, DE, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USA, National Epidemiology Center. Carlos III Health Institute, Madrid, Spain, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, USA, Division of Infectious Disease, Department of Medicine, University of Alabama, Birmingham, USA, HIV Atlanta VA Cohort Study (HAVACS), Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Decatur, GA, USA and Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität, HIVCENTER, Frankfurt, Germany.
  • 3School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR_S 943, F-75013, Paris, France; INSERM, UMR_S 943, F-75013, Paris, France; AP-HP, Hôpital Pitié-Salpétrière, Service des maladies infectieuses et tropicales, F-75013, Paris, France, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA, VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT, USA, Academisch Medisch Centrum bij de Universiteit van Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, University Hospital Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland, Clinic of Infectious Diseases & Tropical Medicine, San Paolo Hospital, University of Milan, Italy, Centre d'Estudis Epidemiològics sobre ITS/VIH/SIDA de Catalunya, Badalona, Spain, Division of Epidemiology and Population Health, British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, Vancouver, Canada, Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, Canada, Research Department of Infection and Population Health, UCL Medical School, London, UK, INSERM U.897, ISPED, Université Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France, Department of Internal Medicine University of Cologne, DE, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USA, National Epidemiology Center. Carlos III Health Institute, Madrid, Spain, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, USA, Division of Infectious Disease, Department of Medicine, University of Alabama, Birmingham, USA, HIV Atlanta VA Cohort Study (HAVACS), Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Decatur, GA, USA and Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität, HIVCENTER, Frankfurt, GermanySchool of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR_S 943, F-75013, Paris, France; INSERM, UMR_S 943, F-75013, Paris, France; AP-HP, Hôpital Pitié-Salpétrière, Service des maladies infectieuses et tropicales, F-75013, Paris, France, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA, VA Co

Abstract

The advent of effective combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) in 1996 resulted in fewer patients experiencing clinical events, so that some prognostic analyses of individual cohort studies of human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals had low statistical power. Because of this, the Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC) of HIV cohort studies in Europe and North America was established in 2000, with the aim of studying the prognosis for clinical events in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the mortality of adult patients treated for HIV-1 infection. In 2002, the ART-CC collected data on more than 12,000 patients in 13 cohorts who had begun combination ART between 1995 and 2001. Subsequent updates took place in 2004, 2006, 2008, and 2010. The ART-CC data base now includes data on more than 70,000 patients participating in 19 cohorts who began treatment before the end of 2009. Data are collected on patient demographics (e.g. sex, age, assumed transmission group, race/ethnicity, geographical origin), HIV biomarkers (e.g. CD4 cell count, plasma viral load of HIV-1), ART regimen, dates and types of AIDS events, and dates and causes of death. In recent years, additional data on co-infections such as hepatitis C; risk factors such as smoking, alcohol and drug use; non-HIV biomarkers such as haemoglobin and liver enzymes; and adherence to ART have been collected whenever available. The data remain the property of the contributing cohorts, whose representatives manage the ART-CC via the steering committee of the Collaboration. External collaboration is welcomed. Details of contacts are given on the ART-CC website (www.art-cohort-collaboration.org).

Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association © The Author 2013; all rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

AIDS; HIV; antiretroviral therapy; cohort study; prognosis

PMID:
23599235
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC4052127
Free PMC Article
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