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PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2013 Apr 4;7(4):e2144. doi: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0002144. Print 2013.

Genetic diversity and geographic distribution of genetically distinct rabies viruses in the Philippines.

Author information

  • 1Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai City, Miyagi, Japan. saitom@med.tohoku.ac.jp

Erratum in

  • PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2013 Jul;7(7). doi:10.1371/annotation/cf5aae8c-03f4-49d5-94e8-06b4f73847f9. Miranda, Mary Elizabeth G [added].

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Rabies continues to be a major public health problem in the Philippines, where 200-300 human cases were reported annually between 2001 and 2011. Understanding the phylogeography of rabies viruses is important for establishing a more effective and feasible control strategy.

METHODS:

We performed a molecular analysis of rabies viruses in the Philippines using rabied animal brain samples. The samples were collected from 11 of 17 regions, which covered three island groups (Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao). Partial nucleoprotein (N) gene sequencing was performed on 57 samples and complete glycoprotein (G) gene sequencing was performed on 235 samples collected between 2004 and 2010.

RESULTS:

The Philippine strains of rabies viruses were included in a distinct phylogenetic cluster, previously named Asian 2b, which appeared to have diverged from the Chinese strain named Asian 2a. The Philippine strains were further divided into three major clades, which were found exclusively in different island groups: clades L, V, and M in Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao, respectively. Clade L was subdivided into nine subclades (L1-L9) and clade V was subdivided into two subclades (V1 and V2). With a few exceptions, most strains in each subclade were distributed in specific geographic areas. There were also four strains that were divided into two genogroups but were not classified into any of the three major clades, and all four strains were found in the island group of Luzon.

CONCLUSION:

We detected three major clades and two distinct genogroups of rabies viruses in the Philippines. Our data suggest that viruses of each clade and subclade evolved independently in each area without frequent introduction into other areas. An important implication of these data is that geographically targeted dog vaccination using the island group approach may effectively control rabies in the Philippines.

PMID:
23593515
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3617229
Free PMC Article

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