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Acta Physiol (Oxf). 2013 Aug;208(4):376-86. doi: 10.1111/apha.12103. Epub 2013 May 2.

Short-term training alters the control of mitochondrial respiration rate before maximal oxidative ATP synthesis.

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  • 1Department of Medicine, Division of Geriatrics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA.

Abstract

AIM:

Short-term exercise training may induce metabolic and performance adaptations before any changes in mitochondrial enzyme potential. However, there has not been a study that has directly assessed changes in mitochondrial oxidative capacity or metabolic control as a consequence of such training in vivo. Therefore, we used (31) P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31) P-MRS) to examine the effect of short-term plantar flexion exercise training on phosphocreatine (PCr) recovery kinetics and the control of respiration rate.

METHOD:

To this aim, we investigated 12 healthy men, experienced with this exercise modality (TRA), and 7 time-control subjects (TC).

RESULTS:

After 5 days of training, maximum work rate during incremental plantar flexion exercise was significantly improved (P < 0.01). During the recovery period, the maximal rate of oxidative adenosine triphosphate synthesis (PRE: 28 ± 13 mm min(-1) ; POST: 26 ± 15 mm min(-1) ) and the PCr recovery time constant (PRE: 31 ± 19 s; POST: 29 ± 16) were not significantly altered. In contrast, the Hill coefficient (nH ) describing the co-operativity between respiration rate and ADP was significantly increased in TRA (PRE: nH = 2.7 ± 1.4; POST: nH = 3.4 ± 1.9, P < 0.05). Meanwhile, there were no systematic variations in any of these variables in TC.

CONCLUSION:

This study reveals that 5 days of training induces rapid adaptation in the allosteric control of respiration rate by ADP before any substantial improvement in muscle oxidative capacity occurs.

© 2013 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

KEYWORDS:

31P-MRS; exercise training; metabolic control; mitochondrial function; skeletal muscle energetics

PMID:
23582030
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3725772
Free PMC Article
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