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Dialogues Clin Neurosci. 2013 Mar;15(1):99-108.

Physical activity and brain plasticity in late adulthood.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, PA, USA. kiericks@pitt.edu

Abstract

in English, French, Spanish

The human brain shrinks with advancing age, but recent research suggests that it is also capable of remarkable plasticity, even in late life. In this review we summarize the research linking greater amounts of physical activity to less cortical atrophy, better brain function, and enhanced cognitive function, and argue that physical activity takes advantage of the brain's natural capacity for plasticity. Further, although the effects of physical activity on the brain are relatively widespread, there is also some specificity, such that prefrontal and hippocampal areas appear to be more influenced than other areas of the brain. The specificity of these effects, we argue, provides a biological basis for understanding the capacity for physical activity to influence neurocognitive and neuropsychiatric disorders such as depression. We conclude that physical activity is a promising intervention that can influence the endogenous pharmacology of the brain to enhance cognitive and emotional function in late adulthood.

KEYWORDS:

aging; brain; exercise; neuroplasticity; physical activity; plasticity

PMID:
23576893
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3622473
Free PMC Article
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