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J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol. 2013 Jun;26(3):186-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jpag.2013.02.009. Epub 2013 Apr 6.

Contraception-related venous thromboembolism in a pediatric institution.

Author information

  • 1Dual-Pediatrics Residency Program, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio 43205, USA.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVE:

To define the thrombotic risk factors of young women presenting to a children's hospital with hormonal contraception-related venous thromboembolism (VTE). We hypothesized that the majority of patients would have additional risk factors for VTE.

DESIGN:

Clinical and laboratory data obtained retrospectively from electronic medical records concerning history of presentation, body mass index (BMI), medical and family history, medication profile, and relevant laboratory studies.

SETTING:

Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, November 2008-May 2012.

PARTICIPANTS:

Twenty-six female patients, age 12-21 years, admitted for hormonal contraception-related VTE.

RESULTS:

Fifty-seven VTE cases were reviewed, and 26 were identified as contraception-related VTE. 96% of patients had at least 1 additional risk factor for VTE, and 42% of patients had 2 or more additional risk factors. 50% patients had a BMI ≥ 25 kg/m(2). 35% of patients had a positive family history of VTE in a first or second-degree relative. 27% of patients were subsequently diagnosed with an inherited thrombophilia, 5 of whom had a positive family history.

CONCLUSION:

In a small population of adolescents presenting to a children's hospital with contraception-related VTE, the majority of patients had multiple risk factors for VTE. Obesity was the most common additional risk factor (50%) identified in our study population. More research is needed regarding the impact of obesity on contraception-related VTE in young women, and whether the presence of obesity should influence thrombophilia screening practices prior to prescribing contraception.

Copyright © 2013 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
23566795
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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