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PLoS One. 2013;8(3):e59272. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0059272. Epub 2013 Mar 12.

Influenza vaccination uptake among the working age population of Japan: results from a national cross-sectional survey.

Author information

  • 1Department of Public Health, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Japan. kwada-sgy@umin.ac.jp

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Influenza vaccination rates among Japanese people of working age (20-69 years) is currently suboptimal, and the reasons for this have not been clearly elucidated. This study examined factors associated with vaccination intention among the working age population in Japan during September 2011, one-month prior to influenza vaccination becoming available.

METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS:

A web-based survey of intention to be vaccinated against influenza in the coming season was undertaken among 3,129 Japanese aged 20 to 69 years. Multinomial logistic regression analysis was used to explore the associations between vaccination intent and other variables. Influenza vaccination intent was associated with having been vaccinated in the previous year (Odds Ratio (OR): 3.81; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 3.75-3.86), the number of children per household (one compared with zero; OR: 1.37; 95%CI: 1.11-1.65), and household income ($50,000 to <$100,000 compared with $0 to <$50,000; OR: 1.30; 95%CI: 1.07-1.54). Smoking was inversely associated with influenza vaccine uptake (current smokers compared with non-smokers; OR: 0.79; 95%CI: 0.61-0.98). A history of either the survey respondent or a household member having being medically diagnosed with influenza in the previous year was not statistically associated with future influenza vaccination intent.

CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE:

Overall, this suggests that intention to be vaccinated among working age Japanese is associated with a past history of influenza vaccination, having children, and the household's income. As such, consideration of these factors should now form the cornerstone of strategies to encourage increased uptake of vaccination against influenza in future years.

PMID:
23555010
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3595249
Free PMC Article
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