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Eur J Clin Invest. 2013 Jun;43(6):545-8. doi: 10.1111/eci.12072. Epub 2013 Mar 29.

Alzheimer's disease and granulocyte density diversity.

Author information

  • 1Department of Internal Medicine, the Vrinnevi Hospital, Norrköping, Sweden. petter.jaremo@telia.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The current study investigates circulating eosinophils and neutrophils in Alzheimer's (AD) type dementia with respect to density (kg/L). The existence of β-amyloid plaques in the brain is a feature of AD. Sporadic scientific reports indicate that the disease affects circulating neutrophils. In contrast, numerous publications investigate inflammatory reactions in AD brains. Locally, the plaques evoke a substantial inflammatory response involving activated microglia and astrocytes.

METHODS:

Subjects with probable AD (n = 39) were included and compared with elderly individuals (n = 22) lacking apparent memory problems. We sampled 10 mL venous blood in citrate. Granulocytes were separated according to density in linear Percoll™ gradients. Subsequently, the gradients were divided into density subfractions (n = 16). In every fraction, determination of eosinophil and neutrophil counts was carried out.

RESULTS:

AD sufferers displayed less granulocytes in fractions nos. 13-15 containing light cells. For these fractions, the P-values proved to be (P < 0.001; not significant; P = 0.03) and (P = 0.01; P = 0.01; not significant), for eosinophils and neutrophils, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

The present work describes that less circulating light granulocytes are a feature of AD demented individuals. It is to hypothesize that it is a sign of impaired granulocyte turnover and cell damage. It is concluded that AD affects inflammatory cells in the periphery and that the behaviour of granulocytes in dementia is worthwhile further studies.

© 2013 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

PMID:
23551244
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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