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Eur Arch Paediatr Dent. 2013 Apr;14(2):65-71. doi: 10.1007/s40368-013-0015-x. Epub 2013 Apr 3.

Clinical, radiographic and histologic analysis of the effects of pulp capping materials used in pulpotomies of human primary teeth.

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  • 1Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Orthodontics and Public Health, Bauru School of Dentistry, University of São Paulo, Alameda Dr. Octávio Pinheiro Brisolla, 9-75, Bauru, São Paulo, 17012-901, Brazil, marchini@usp.br.

Abstract

AIM:

To compare the clinical, radiographic and histological responses of the pulp to mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), calcium hydroxide (CH) and Portland cement (PC) when used as a pulpotomy agent in human primary teeth.

STUDY DESIGN:

Forty-five mandibular primary molar teeth were randomly assigned to CH, MTA or PC groups and treated by pulpotomy technique.

METHODS:

The teeth were treated by conventional pulpotomy technique, differing only in the capping material for each group. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were recorded at 6-, 12- and 24-month follow-up. Teeth in the regular exfoliation period were further processed for histologic analysis.

STATISTICS:

Data were tested using parametric tests at a significance level of 5 %. The histological results were expressed descriptively.

RESULTS:

Clinically and radiographically, the MTA and PC groups showed 100 % success rates at 6, 12 and 24 months. In CH group, several teeth presented clinical and radiographic failures detected throughout the follow-up period, and internal resorption was a frequent radiographic finding. Histologic analysis revealed the presence of dentine-like mineralised material deposition obliterating the root canal in the PC and MTA groups. CH group presented, in most of the sections, necrotic areas in the root canals.

CONCLUSIONS:

MTA and PC may serve as effective materials for pulpotomies of primary teeth as compared to CH. Although our results are very encouraging, further studies and longer follow-up assessments are needed in order to determine the safe clinical indication of Portland cement.

PMID:
23549993
[PubMed - in process]
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