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BMC Med Ethics. 2013 Apr 2;14:17. doi: 10.1186/1472-6939-14-17.

Biobanking research on oncological residual material: a framework between the rights of the individual and the interest of society.

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  • 1Department of Molecular Medicine, University of Padova, Via Falloppio 50, 35121 Padua, Italy. luciana.caenazzo@unipd.it

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The tissue biobanking of specific biological residual materials, which constitutes a useful resource for medical/scientific research, has raised some ethical issues, such as the need to define which kind of consent is applicable for biological residual materials biobanks.

DISCUSSION:

Biobank research cannot be conducted without considering arguments for obtaining the donors' consent: in this paper we discuss to what extent consent in biobank research on oncological residual materials has to be required, and what type of consent would be appropriate in this context, considering the ethical principles of donation, solidarity, protection of the donors' rights and the requirements of scientific progress. Regarding the relationship between informed consent and tissue collection, storage and research, we have focused on two possible choices related to the treatment of data and samples in the biobank: irreversible and reversible anonymization of the samples, distinguishing between biobank research on residual materials for which obtaining consent is necessary and justified, and biobank research for which it is not. The procedures involve different approaches and possible solutions that we will seek to define. The consent for clinical research reported in the Helsinki Declaration regards research involving human beings and for this reason it is subordinate to specific and detailed information on the research projects.

SUMMARY:

An important ethical aspect in regard to the role of Biobanks is encouraging sample donation. For donors, seeing human samples being kept rather than discarded, and seeing them become useful for research highlights the importance of the human body and improves the attitude towards donation. This process might also facilitate the giving of informed consent more willingly, and with greater trust.

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