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Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2013 Jun 1;269(2):195-204. doi: 10.1016/j.taap.2013.03.010. Epub 2013 Mar 27.

In silico modeling to predict drug-induced phospholipidosis.

Author information

  • 1Science and Research Staff, Office of Pharmaceutical Science, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002, USA.

Abstract

Drug-induced phospholipidosis (DIPL) is a preclinical finding during pharmaceutical drug development that has implications on the course of drug development and regulatory safety review. A principal characteristic of drugs inducing DIPL is known to be a cationic amphiphilic structure. This provides evidence for a structure-based explanation and opportunity to analyze properties and structures of drugs with the histopathologic findings for DIPL. In previous work from the FDA, in silico quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) modeling using machine learning approaches has shown promise with a large dataset of drugs but included unconfirmed data as well. In this study, we report the construction and validation of a battery of complementary in silico QSAR models using the FDA's updated database on phospholipidosis, new algorithms and predictive technologies, and in particular, we address high performance with a high-confidence dataset. The results of our modeling for DIPL include rigorous external validation tests showing 80-81% concordance. Furthermore, the predictive performance characteristics include models with high sensitivity and specificity, in most cases above ≥80% leading to desired high negative and positive predictivity. These models are intended to be utilized for regulatory toxicology applied science needs in screening new drugs for DIPL.

Published by Elsevier Inc.

PMID:
23541745
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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