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J Bone Miner Metab. 2013 Jul;31(4):455-60. doi: 10.1007/s00774-013-0432-2. Epub 2013 Mar 28.

Lower vitamin E serum levels are associated with osteoporosis in early postmenopausal women: a cross-sectional study.

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  • 1Department of I+D+i, Sanyres Group, 14012, Córdoba, Spain.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between vitamin E status and osteoporosis in early postmenopausal women. Anthropometric data, osteoporosis risk factors, vitamin E serum levels, bone mineral density (BMD) and other serum parameters which may influence bone mineral density in postmenopausal women were analyzed in a cross-sectional study. The association between osteoporosis and age, age of menopause, body mass index, osteocalcin, calcium, vitamin D, vitamin E (measured as 25 hydroxyvitamin D and as α-tocopherol:lipids ratio, respectively), bone alkaline phosphatase, smoking status, leisure physical activity and alcohol intake were modeled by a multivariate logistic regression and multi-linear regression analysis in 232 early postmenopausal women. A lower vitamin E:lipid ratio was associated with osteoporosis in multivariate logistic regression. In a multivariate linear model with BMD of the lumbar spine as a dependent variable, the vitamin E:lipid ratio was clearly related with BMD of the lumbar spine (F ratio = 6.30, p = 0.002). BMD of the lumbar spine was significantly higher in the highest tertile of the vitamin E:lipid ratio than in the lowest tertile. The mean vitamin E:lipid ratio was significantly lower in osteoporotic postmenopausal women (T score ≤-2.5) (3.0 ± 0.6 μmol/mmol) than normal (neither osteoporotic nor osteopenic) postmenopausal women (T score >-1) (3.5 ± 0.7 μmol/mmol) using multivariable-adjusted BMD. These findings highlight that vitamin E may increase BMD in healthy postmenopausal women.

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PMID:
23536191
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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