Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Int J Infect Dis. 2013 Aug;17(8):e621-3. doi: 10.1016/j.ijid.2013.02.010. Epub 2013 Mar 25.

Candidemia among adults in Soweto, South Africa, 1990-2007.

Author information

  • 1Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital and University of the Witwatersrand, Bertsham, Johannesburg, South Africa.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Studies on candidemia occurring among adults in Southern African are limited. We aimed to document the epidemiology of candidemia among adults in Soweto.

METHODS:

This was a retrospective hospital-based study in three discrete periods, involving 9 years, from 1990 to 2007.

RESULTS:

Two hundred and sixty-six patients were identified. Case rates were 2.8 cases/10 000 admissions in 1998-2002 and 3.6 episodes/10 000 hospitalizations in 2005-2007. In 1990, Candida albicans caused 62% and Candida tropicalis caused 23% of episodes. In 2005-2007, major species were C. albicans (46%), Candida parapsilosis (25%), and Candida glabrata (23%), with little change compared to 1998-2002. Major predisposing conditions were abdominal surgery (43%), HIV infection (19% in 2005-2007), trauma (16%), diabetes mellitus (12%), and cancer (8%). General wards superseded intensive care as the major diagnostic setting in 2005-2007. The crude mortality was 60%. Among 22 HIV-infected patients with a median CD4 cell count of 68/μl, three were of community-onset. C. albicans caused 73% of cases. Five patients had another predisposing condition and five had central venous catheters. The mortality was 73%.

CONCLUSIONS:

Soweto has a pattern of Candida species different from other continents. HIV infection and trauma were important predisposing conditions.

Copyright © 2013 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk