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Asian Pac J Cancer Prev. 2013;14(1):117-20.

Knowledge of risk factors and early detection methods and practices towards breast cancer among nurses in Indira Gandhi Medical College, Shimla, Himachal Pradesh, India.

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  • 1Department of Radiotherapy, IGMC, Shimla, India. drfotedar@rediffmail.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Breast cancer is an increasing health problem in India. Screening for early detection should lead to a reduction in mortality from the disease. It is known that motivation by nurses influences uptake of screening methods by women. This study aimed to investigate knowledge of breast cancer risk factors and early detection methods and the practice of screening among nurses in Indira Gandhi Medical College, Shimla, Himachal Pradesh.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

A cross-sectional study was conducted using a self-administered questionnaire to assess the knowledge of breast cancer risk factors, early detection methods and practice of screening methods among 457 nurses working in an Indira Gandhi Medical College, Shimla-H.P. Chi square test, Data was analysed using SPSS version 16. Test of significance used was chi square test.

RESULTS:

The response rate of the study was 94.9%. The average knowledge of risk factors about breast cancer of the entire population is 49%. 10.5% of nurses had poor knowledge, 25.2% of the nurses had good knowledge, 45% had very good knowledge and 16.3% of the nurses had excellent knowledge about risk factors of breast cancer and early detection methods. The knowledge level was significantly higher among BSC nurses than nurses with Diploma. 54% of participants in this study reportedly practice BSE at least once every year. Less than one-third reported that they had CBE within the past one year. 7% ever had mammogram before this study.

CONCLUSIONS:

Results from this study suggest the frequent continuing medical education programmes on breast cancer at institutional level is desirable.

PMID:
23534708
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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