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Asian Spine J. 2013 Mar;7(1):14-9. doi: 10.4184/asj.2013.7.1.14. Epub 2013 Mar 6.

Interference of detection rate of lumbar disc herniation by socioeconomic status.

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  • 1Department of Neurosurgery, Guro Teun Teun Hospital, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN:

Retrospective study.

PURPOSE:

The objective of the study is to evaluate the relationship between the detection rate of lumbar disc herniation and socioeconomic status.

OVERVIEW OF LITERATURE:

Income is one important determinant of public health. Yet, there are no reports about the relationship between socioeconomic status and the detective rate of disc herniation.

METHODS:

In this study, 443 cases were checked for lumbar computed tomography for lumbar disc herniation, and they reviewed questionnaires about their socioeconomic status, the presence of back pain or radiating pain and the presence of a medical certificate (to check the medical or surgical treatment for the pain) during the Korean conscription.

RESULTS:

Without the consideration for the presence of a medical certificate, there was no difference in spinal physical grade according to socioeconomic status (p=0.290). But, with the consideration of the presence of a medical certificate, the significant statistical differences were observed according to socioeconomic status in 249 cases in the presence of a medical certificate (p=0.028). There was a lower detection rate in low economic status individuals than those in the high economic class. The common reason for not submitting a medical certificate is that it is neither necessary for the people of lower socioeconomic status nor is it financially affordable.

CONCLUSIONS:

The prevalence of lumbar disc herniation is not different according to socioeconomic status, but the detective rate was affected by socioeconomic status. Socioeconomic status is an important factor for detecting lumbar disc herniation.

KEYWORDS:

Conscription; Herniated disc; Prevalence; Socioeconomic status

PMID:
23508288
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC3596579
Free PMC Article
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