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Scand J Work Environ Health. 2013 Sep 1;39(5):515-20. doi: 10.5271/sjweh.3356. Epub 2013 Mar 14.

Working hours and depressive symptomatology among full-time employees: Results from the fourth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2007-2009).

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  • 1Department of Occupational Health, Graduate School of Public Health, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study aimed to examine the distribution of working hours and the association between working hours and depressive symptomatology using representative data from a national, population-based survey.

METHOD:

Data came from the fourth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2007-2009), which employed a systematic, stratified cluster-sampling method. We used logistic regression procedures to estimate the importance of weekly working hours as a predictor of depressive symptomatology.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of depressive symptomatology was 10.2%. The work week, which averaged 48.3 hours for the sample as a whole, was longer for men (49.8 hours) than women (45.3 hours), and 12.1% of respondents were engaged in shift work. In logistic regression analyses, compared to those working < 52 hours per week, the odds ratios (OR) of working hours as a predictor of depressive symptomatology were 1.19 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.77-1.85] for those working 52-59 hours per week and 1.62 (95% CI 1.20-2.18) for those working ≥ 60 hours per week, after adjustment for demographic characteristics, health behaviors, socioeconomic status, employment status, and work schedules. It showed a positive dose-response relationship between working hours and depressive symptomatology (P = 0.0059).

CONCLUSIONS:

Working hours in Korea are long. There is an association between working hours and depressive symptomatology, and there seems be a trend in working hours and depressive symptomatology.

PMID:
23503616
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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