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J Clin Sleep Med. 2013 Mar 15;9(3):217-25. doi: 10.5664/jcsm.2482.

Concordance of polysomnographic and actigraphic measurement of sleep and wake in older women with insomnia.

Author information

  • 1Departments of Biobehavioral Nursing & Health Systems, University of Washington, School of Nursing, Seattle, WA 98195-7262, USA. dmtaibi@uw.edu

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES:

The objective of this secondary analysis was to evaluate concurrent validity of actigraphy and polysomnography (PSG) in older women with insomnia.

METHODS:

Concurrent validity of actigraphy and PSG was examined through (1) comparison of sleep outcomes from each recording method; (2) calculation of sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and predictive values from epoch-by-epoch data; and (3) statistical and graphical exploration of the relationship between sleep disturbance severity and concordance of actigraphy and PSG. Subjects were 16 community-dwelling older women (mean age 69.4 ± 8.1) with insomnia who underwent 8 nights of concurrent actigraphy and PSG.

RESULTS:

Sleep efficiency reflected much greater sleep disturbance on PSG (66.9%) than actigraphy (84.4%). Based on generalized linear models, the parameter estimates for agreement between actigraphy and PSG were statistically significant (p < 0.05) for total sleep time and sleep latency, verged on significance for WASO (p = 0.052), but was not significant for sleep efficiency (p = 0.20). Epoch-by-epoch analysis showed high sensitivity (96.1%), low specificity (36.4%), and modest values on agreement (75.4%) and predictive values of sleep (74.7%) and wake (80.2%). Generalized linear models showed that overall accuracy of actigraphy declined as sleep efficiency declined (unstandardized Beta = 0.741, p < 0.001). Based on this model, sleep efficiency of 73% was the point at which accuracy declined below an acceptable accuracy value of 80%.

CONCLUSIONS:

Actigraphy offers a relatively inexpensive and unobtrusive method for measuring sleep, but it appears to underestimate sleep disturbance, particularly at sleep efficiency levels below 73%, in older women with insomnia.

KEYWORDS:

Actigraphy; aging; insomnia; sleep; sleep initiation and maintenance disorders

PMID:
23493815
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3578686
Free PMC Article
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