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Cell Mol Life Sci. 2013 May;70(9):1543-73. doi: 10.1007/s00018-013-1296-2. Epub 2013 Mar 10.

The role of genetics in the establishment and maintenance of the epigenome.

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  • 1Cancer Epigenetics Laboratory, Institute of Oncology of Asturias (IUOPA-HUCA), University of Oviedo, Oviedo, Spain.

Abstract

Epigenetic mechanisms play an important role in gene regulation during development. DNA methylation, which is probably the most important and best-studied epigenetic mechanism, can be abnormally regulated in common pathologies, but the origin of altered DNA methylation remains unknown. Recent research suggests that these epigenetic alterations could depend, at least in part, on genetic mutations or polymorphisms in DNA methyltransferases and certain genes encoding enzymes of the one-carbon metabolism pathway. Indeed, the de novo methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B) has been recently found to be mutated in several types of cancer and in the immunodeficiency, centromeric region instability and facial anomalies syndrome (ICF), in which these mutations could be related to the loss of global DNA methylation. In addition, mutations in glycine-N-methyltransferase (GNMT) could be associated with a higher risk of hepatocellular carcinoma and liver disease due to an unbalanced S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)/S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) ratio, which leads to aberrant methylation reactions. Also, genetic variants of chromatin remodeling proteins and histone tail modifiers are involved in genetic disorders like α thalassemia X-linked mental retardation syndrome, CHARGE syndrome, Cockayne syndrome, Rett syndrome, systemic lupus erythematous, Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome, Coffin-Lowry syndrome, Sotos syndrome, and facioescapulohumeral syndrome, among others. Here, we review the potential genetic alterations with a possible role on epigenetic factors and discuss their contribution to human disease.

PMID:
23474979
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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