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Eur J Radiol. 2013 Jun;82(6):1002-7. doi: 10.1016/j.ejrad.2013.01.029. Epub 2013 Mar 7.

An analysis of radiological research publications in high impact general medical journals between 1996 and 2010.

Author information

  • 1Department of Radiology, Kangdong Seong-Sim Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, 445 Gil-dong Kangdong-Gu, Seoul 134-701, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate scientific papers published by radiologists in high impact general medical journals between 1996 and 2010.

METHODS:

A MEDLINE search was performed in five high impact general medical journals (AIM, BMJ, JAMA, Lancet, and NEJM) for all articles of which a radiologist was the first author between 1996 and 2010. The following information was abstracted from the original articles: radiological subspecialty, imaging technique used, type of research, sample size, study design, statistical analysis, study outcome, declared funding, number of authors, collaboration, and country of the first author.

RESULTS:

Of 216 (0.19%) articles were published by radiologists in five general medical journals between 1996 and 2010, 83 were original articles. Fifteen (18.1%) original articles were concerned with the field of vascular/interventional radiology, 24 (28.9%) used combined imaging techniques, 76 (91.6%) were clinical research, 63 (75.9%) had a sample size of >50, 65 (78.3%) were prospective, 78 (94.0%) performed statistical analysis, 83 (100%) showed positive study outcomes, 57 (68.7%) were funded, 49 (59.0%) had from four to seven authors, and 79 (95.2%) were collaborative studies.

CONCLUSIONS:

A very small number (0.19%) in five high impact general medical journals was published by radiologists between 1996 and 2010.

Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
23466028
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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