Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Magn Reson Imaging. 2013 Dec;38(6):1578-84. doi: 10.1002/jmri.24071. Epub 2013 Feb 28.

Water-fat MRI for assessing changes in bone marrow composition due to radiation and chemotherapy in gynecologic cancer patients.

Author information

  • 1Center for Magnetic Resonance Research, Department of Radiology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To assess the feasibility of using fat-fraction imaging for measuring marrow composition changes over large regions in patients undergoing cancer therapy.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Thirteen women with gynecologic malignancies who were to receive radiation and/or chemotherapy were recruited for this study. Subjects were imaged on a 3T magnetic resonance (MR) scanner at baseline (after surgery but before radiation or chemotherapy), 6 months, and 12 months after treatment. Water-fat imaging was used to generate high-resolution, 3D signal fat fraction (sFF) maps extending from mid-femur to L3. Treatment changes were assessed by measuring marrow sFF in the L4 vertebra, femoral necks, and control tissues.

RESULTS:

Pretreatment and 6-month scans were compared in nine women. sFF increased significantly in both the L4 vertebral marrow (P = 0.04) and the femoral necks (P = 0.03), while no significant change was observed in control regions. Qualitatively, chemotherapy changes were more uniform in space, whereas the radiation-induced changes were largest in marrow regions inside and close to the target radiation field.

CONCLUSION:

Water-fat MRI is sensitive to changes in red/yellow marrow composition, and can be used for quantitative and qualitative assessment of treatment-induced marrow damage.

Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

KEYWORDS:

Dixon MRI; bone marrow; water-fat imaging

PMID:
23450703
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3690168
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk