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Oral Oncol. 2013 Jun;49(6):576-81. doi: 10.1016/j.oraloncology.2013.01.006. Epub 2013 Feb 19.

Frequency of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 gene amplification in oral tongue squamous cell carcinomas and associations with clinical features and patient outcome.

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  • 1Research Division, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Australia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Novel therapies are required for patients with recurrent or metastatic oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC). Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1 (FGFR1) amplification frequently occurs in squamous cell carcinoma of the lung and represents a novel druggable therapeutic target in this and other malignancies. This study examined the frequency and clinical associations of FGFR1 amplification in OTSCC.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

The frequency of FGFR1 amplification determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization was evaluated in a cohort of 123 OTSCC patients. Associations of FGFR1 amplification with clinical characteristics and outcome were determined.

RESULTS:

FGFR1 gene amplification was present in 9.3% (10/107) of cases and was significantly associated with smoking status (P = 0.03). FGFR1 amplification was seen more commonly in males (9/10 amplified cases male, P = 0.16) and there were no associations with age, stage, T stage, nodal status, alcohol history or performance status (all P>0.05). Outcome was not significantly different between FGFR1 amplified and non-amplified patients.

CONCLUSIONS:

Copy number variations of the FGFR1 gene occur in a subset of OTSCC with approximately 10% of cases showing amplification of the gene. FGFR1 amplification may represent a therapeutic target in OTSCC.

Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
23434054
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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