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Neurobiol Aging. 2013 Jul;34(7):1902-12. doi: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2013.01.012. Epub 2013 Feb 19.

Advanced glycation end-products disrupt the blood-brain barrier by stimulating the release of transforming growth factor-β by pericytes and vascular endothelial growth factor and matrix metalloproteinase-2 by endothelial cells in vitro.

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  • 1Department of Neurology and Clinical Neuroscience, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, Ube, Japan.

Abstract

Diabetic encephalopathy is now accepted as an important complication of diabetes. The breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is associated with dementia in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The purpose of this study was to identify the possible mechanisms responsible for the disruption of the BBB after exposure to advanced glycation end-products (AGEs). We investigated the effect of AGEs on the basement membrane and the barrier property of the BBB by Western blot analysis, using our newly established lines of human brain microvascular endothelial cell (BMEC), pericytes, and astrocytes. AGEs reduced the expression of claudin-5 in BMECs by increasing the autocrine signaling through vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) secreted by the BMECs themselves. Furthermore, AGEs increased the amount of fibronectin in the pericytes through a similar up-regulation of the autocrine transforming growth factor (TGF)-β released by pericytes. These results indicated that AGEs induce basement membrane hypertrophy of the BBB by increasing the degree of autocrine TGF-β signaling by pericytes, and thereby disrupt the BBB through the up-regulation of VEGF and MMP-2 in BMECs under diabetic conditions.

Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

PMID:
23428182
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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