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Am J Med. 2013 Mar;126(3):243-8. doi: 10.1016/j.amjmed.2012.10.011.

Vitamin K deficiency is associated with incident knee osteoarthritis.

Author information

  • 1Boston University School of Medicine, Mass, USA. devyani.misra@BMC.org

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, with knee osteoarthritis being the leading cause of lower extremity disability among older adults in the US. There are no treatments available to prevent the structural pathology of osteoarthritis. Because of vitamin K's role in regulating skeletal mineralization, it has potential to be a preventative option for osteoarthritis. We therefore examined the relation of vitamin K to new-onset radiographic knee osteoarthritis and early osteoarthritis changes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

METHODS:

Subjects from the Multicenter Osteoarthritis (MOST) Study had knee radiographs and MRI scans obtained at baseline and 30 months later, and plasma phylloquinone (vitamin K) measured at baseline. We examined the relationship of subclinical vitamin K deficiency to incident radiographic knee osteoarthritis and MRI-based cartilage lesions and osteophytes, respectively, using log binomial regression with generalized estimating equations, adjusting for potential confounders.

RESULTS:

Among 1180 participants (62% women, mean age 62±8 years, mean body mass index 30.1±5.1 kg/m(2)), subclinical vitamin K deficiency was associated with incident radiographic knee osteoarthritis (risk ratio [RR] 1.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08-2.25) and cartilage lesions (RR 2.39; 95% CI, 1.05-5.40) compared with no deficiency, but not with osteophytes (RR 2.35; 95% CI, 0.54-10.13). Subclinically vitamin K-deficient subjects were more likely to develop osteoarthritis in one or both knees than neither knee (RR 1.33; 95% CI, 1.01-1.75 and RR 2.12; 95% CI, 1.06-4.24, respectively).

CONCLUSION:

In the first such longitudinal study, subclinical vitamin K deficiency was associated with increased risk of developing radiographic knee osteoarthritis and MRI-based cartilage lesions. Further study of vitamin K is warranted given its therapeutic/prophylactic potential for osteoarthritis.

Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
23410565
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3641753
Free PMC Article
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