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Obesity (Silver Spring). 2013 Mar;21(3):504-9. doi: 10.1002/oby.20055.

Endothelial function and weight loss: comparison of low-carbohydrate and low-fat diets.

Author information

  • 1Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Division, Section of Vascular Medicine, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. mohlere@uphs.upenn.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The effect of weight loss on obesity-associated endothelial dysfunction is not clear because of conflicting data, demonstrating both improvement and no change in endothelial function after weight loss in obese subjects. A 2-year prospective study (n = 121) was conducted to examine: (1) the effect of obesity and weight loss (either a low-carbohydrate or and low-fat diet) on flow mediated vasodilatation (FMD), a measure of endothelial function.

DESIGN AND METHODS:

Participants reduced body weight by 7.1% ± 4.4%, 8.7% ± 6.8%, 7.1% ± 7.8%, and 4.1% ± 7.7% at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months, respectively with no significant differences between the low-fat and low-carbohydrate groups.

RESULTS:

Endothelial function was inversely correlated with waist circumference, triglyceride level, and directly correlated with leptin in obese persons prior to weight loss. These weight losses did not confer any improvements in FMD. There were no differences between the low-fat and low-carbohydrate diets in FMD at any time point. At 6 months (r = 0.26, P = 0.04) and 1 year (r =0.28, P = 0.03), there were positive correlations between change in FMD and change in leptin but not at 2 years.

CONCLUSION:

There was no significant improvement in endothelial function after 7.1% ± 7.8% weight loss at 1 year and 4.1% ± 7.7% at 2 years, achieved by either a low carbohydrate or a low fat diet.

Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

PMID:
23404949
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3630284
Free PMC Article
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