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J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2013 Jun 1;63(2):228-33. doi: 10.1097/QAI.0b013e31828a7056.

Risk factors for seropositivity to Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus among children in Uganda.

Author information

  • 1Medical Research Council, Uganda Virus Research Institute, Uganda Research Unit on AIDS, Entebbe, Uganda. katie.wakeham@mrcuganda.org

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Determinants of Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) seropositivity among children living in sub-Saharan African populations where infection is endemic are not well understood. Local environmental factors, including other infectious agents, may be key.

METHODS:

Within the context of a well-characterized birth cohort, we examined associations between various factors and antibodies against KSHV, measured in stored plasma samples from 1823 mother-child pairs in Entebbe, Uganda.

RESULTS:

Seroprevalence increased with increasing age of the child (P = 0.0003) and was higher among those with KSHV seropositive mothers than in those without (12% vs 9%; odds ratio: 1.4, 95% confidence interval: 1.1 to 2.0). It was also higher among children with HIV infection (29% vs 10%; odds ratio: 3.1, 95% confidence interval: 1.2 to 8.3) or malaria parasitemia (30% vs 10%; odds ratio: 4.1, 95% confidence interval: 2.4 to 7.0) than in children without. These associations were not explained by socioeconomic status.

CONCLUSIONS:

The finding that KSHV serostatus is associated with malaria parasitemia in children is novel. In a country endemic for KSHV, malaria may be a cofactor for KSHV infection or reactivation among children.

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PMID:
23403859
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3707567
Free PMC Article
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