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Br J Cancer. 2013 Mar 5;108(4):848-58. doi: 10.1038/bjc.2013.40. Epub 2013 Feb 12.

Oxidative stress specifically downregulates survivin to promote breast tumour formation.

Author information

  • 1Department of Internal Medicine, Charles Drew University of Medicine and Science, Los Angeles, CA 90059, USA. spervin@mednet.ucla.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Breast cancer, a heterogeneous disease has been broadly classified into oestrogen receptor positive (ER+) or oestrogen receptor negative (ER-) tumour types. Each of these tumours is dependent on specific signalling pathways for their progression. While high levels of survivin, an anti-apoptotic protein, increases aggressive behaviour in ER- breast tumours, oxidative stress (OS) promotes the progression of ER+ breast tumours. Mechanisms and molecular targets by which OS promotes tumourigenesis remain poorly understood.

RESULTS:

DETA-NONOate, a nitric oxide (NO)-donor induces OS in breast cancer cell lines by early re-localisation and downregulation of cellular survivin. Using in vivo models of HMLE(HRAS) xenografts and E2-induced breast tumours in ACI rats, we demonstrate that high OS downregulates survivin during initiation of tumourigenesis. Overexpression of survivin in HMLE(HRAS) cells led to a significant delay in tumour initiation and tumour volume in nude mice. This inverse relationship between survivin and OS was also observed in ER+ human breast tumours. We also demonstrate an upregulation of NADPH oxidase-1 (NOX1) and its activating protein p67, which are novel markers of OS in E2-induced tumours in ACI rats and as well as in ER+ human breast tumours.

CONCLUSION:

Our data, therefore, suggest that downregulation of survivin could be an important early event by which OS initiates breast tumour formation.

PMID:
23403820
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3590675
Free PMC Article
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