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Trends Neurosci. 2013 May;36(5):305-12. doi: 10.1016/j.tins.2013.01.005. Epub 2013 Feb 4.

Gut-brain axis: how the microbiome influences anxiety and depression.

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  • 1Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University, at St. Joseph's Healthcare, 50 Charlton Ave. E, T3308, Hamilton, ON, L8N 4A6, Canada. jfoster@mcmaster.ca

Abstract

Within the first few days of life, humans are colonized by commensal intestinal microbiota. Here, we review recent findings showing that microbiota are important in normal healthy brain function. We also discuss the relation between stress and microbiota, and how alterations in microbiota influence stress-related behaviors. New studies show that bacteria, including commensal, probiotic, and pathogenic bacteria, in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract can activate neural pathways and central nervous system (CNS) signaling systems. Ongoing and future animal and clinical studies aimed at understanding the microbiota-gut-brain axis may provide novel approaches for prevention and treatment of mental illness, including anxiety and depression.

Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
23384445
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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