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Arthritis Res Ther. 2013 Feb 4;15(1):204. [Epub ahead of print]

Dendritic cells and the promise of antigen-specific therapy in rheumatoid arthritis.

Author information

  • The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, Translational Research Institute, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland 4102, Australia. ranjeny.thomas@uq.edu.au.

Abstract

ABSTRACT: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disease resulting from an autoimmune response to self-antigens, leading to inflammation of synovial tissue of joints and subsequent cartilage and bone erosion. Current disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs and biologic inhibitors of TNF, IL-6, T cells and B cells block inflammation nonspecifically, which may lead to adverse effects, including infection. They do not generally induce long-term drug-free remission or restoration of immune tolerance to self-antigens, and lifelong treatment is usual. The development of antigen-specific strategies in RA has so far been limited by insufficient knowledge of autoantigens, of the autoimmune pathogenesis of RA and of the mechanisms of immune tolerance in man. Effective tolerance-inducing antigen-specific immunotherapeutic strategies hold promise of greater specificity, of lower toxicity and of a longer-term solution for controlling or even preventing RA. This paper reviews current understanding of autoantigens and their relationship to immunopathogenesis of RA, and emerging therapeutics that aim to leverage normal tolerance mechanisms for implementation of antigen-specific therapy in RA.

PMID:
23374912
[PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
PMCID:
PMC3672739
Free PMC Article

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