Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Am Coll Surg. 2013 Apr;216(4):800-11; discussion 811-3. doi: 10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2012.12.030. Epub 2013 Jan 26.

Clinical impact of a value-based decision: a surgical case study.

Author information

  • 1Department of Surgery, Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC 20016, USA. jrkcdk1@aol.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Value is an economic utility defined by quality and cost, with the maximum benefit achieved by improving quality and reducing cost simultaneously. Health care systems are using value-based analysis to identify the best practices (BPs) that accomplish this goal.

STUDY DESIGN:

We chose a clinical condition, deep venous thrombophlebitis (DVT) to test this hypothesis by identifying the BPs available in the literature; determining the usual practice for DVT prophylaxis at each of 8 hospitals (ie, community, tertiary, and a university hospital) in an integrated system; measuring clinical outcomes (mortality and morbidity) for each hospital; determining cost for each treatment algorithm in each hospital; and measuring the savings opportunity if a single BP was used by all of the hospitals.

RESULTS:

The literature suggests that the BPs for DVT prophylaxis consist of sequential compression devices for short-stay procedures; unfractionated heparin for inpatient procedures, and low molecular weight heparin for thrombotic events. Four of the hospitals were using these BPs; the others relied on sequential compression devices and low molecular weight heparin for prophylaxis. Outcomes were identical and value-based analysis suggested a savings opportunity of nearly $4 million if a single BP was adopted.

CONCLUSIONS:

There were substantial variations in the type of DVT prophylaxis used by the hospitals with no difference in outcomes. A single BP increased value and resulted in savings of $1.5 million, with a savings opportunity of nearly $4 million.

Copyright © 2013 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
23357725
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk