Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2013 Jan 28;10:11. doi: 10.1186/1479-5868-10-11.

Neighbourhood safety and leisure-time physical activity among Dutch adults: a multilevel perspective.

Author information

  • 1Department of Public Health, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. d.kramer@amc.uva.nl

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Several neighbourhood elements have been found to be related to leisure-time walking and cycling. However, the association with neighbourhood safety remains unclear. This study aimed to assess the association of neighbourhood-level safety with leisure-time walking and cycling among Dutch adults.

METHODS:

Data were derived from the national health survey (POLS) 2006-2009, with valid data on 20046 respondents residing in 2127 neighbourhoods. Multilevel logistic regression models were used to examine the association between neighbourhood-level safety (general safety and specific safety components: physical disorder, social disorder, crime-related fear, traffic safety) and residents' engagement in outdoor leisure-time walking and cycling for at least 30 minutes per week.

RESULTS:

An increase in neighbourhood safety (both general safety and each of the safety components) was significantly associated with an increase in leisure-time cycling participation. Associations were strongest for general safety and among older women. In the general population, neighbourhood safety was not significantly associated with leisure-time walking. However, among younger and older adult men and lower educated individuals, an increase in general safety was associated with a decrease in leisure-time walking participation.

CONCLUSIONS:

In the Netherlands, neighbourhood safety appears to be related to leisure-time cycling but not to walking. Leisure-time cycling may best be encouraged by improving different safety components at once, rather than focusing on one safety aspect such as traffic safety. Special attention is needed for older women.

PMID:
23356476
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3570419
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for BioMed Central Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk