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Exp Biol Med (Maywood). 2012 Dec;237(12):1379-86. doi: 10.1258/ebm.2012.012139.

Evaluation of healing wound and genotoxicity potentials from extracts hydroalcoholic of Plantago major and Siparuna guianensis.

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  • 1Lab of Tissue Processing, Universidade Federal de São João Del Rei., Chanadour CEP 35.501-296, Divinópolis, Minas Gerais, Brazil.

Abstract

Despite the large use of the Plantago major and Siparuna guianensis in traditional medicine, there are no studies demonstrating the effectiveness from extracts of these plants in the healing process by the present methodology. This study reported the effects and toxicity of the P. major and S. guianensis extracts in the wound healing compared with a commercial product used in Brazil by macroscopic and microscopic analysis. Following injury in cervical dorsal area of the mice, the extract from P. major and S. guianensis and ointment was applied after an injury in cervical dorsal area of the mice. Wound healing rates were calculated at 4, 9, 15 and 21 d after the wounding, and tissues were obtained on the ninth day for histological analysis. Moreover, mutagenic assay of extracts was performed. Mutagenicity studies carried out with plant extracts showed not mutagenic with or without metabolic activations. Reduction of the wound area occurred earlier in mice treated with P. major and control treatment. On the 15th day, the complete wound closure occurred in P. major-treated wounds. Throughout ointment and S. guianensis treatment it was not observed the wound closured. Microscopic analyses of the wound, on the ninth day, showed the more efficient formation of the neoepithelium and skin appendages in animals treated with S. guianensis and P. major, while ointment treatment presented no re-epithelialization and absent skin appendages in wound. Thus, P. major extract showed good effects on wound healing processes rendering it a promising candidate for the treatment of wounds what also justified its traditional usage in wound treatment.

PMID:
23354396
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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