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Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2013 Jan 25;10:9. doi: 10.1186/1479-5868-10-9.

Are screen-based sedentary behaviors longitudinally associated with dietary behaviors and leisure-time physical activity in the transition into adolescence?

Author information

  • 1Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. mekdes.gebremariam@medisin.uio.no

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There is a need for more longitudinal studies investigating the associations between screen-based sedentary behaviors (SB), dietary behaviors and leisure-time physical activity (PA).

METHODS:

In the HEIA cohort study, 908 children were followed from age 11 to age 13 (September 2007-May 2009). The children self-reported their intake of fruits, vegetables, soft drinks with sugar and snacks. TV/DVD use, computer/game use and leisure-time PA were also self-reported. Multilevel generalized linear mixed model analysis was used to assess longitudinal associations between the screen-based SB and each of the two other behaviors.

RESULTS:

Twenty-month changes in TV/DVD use and computer/game use were positively associated with changes in the consumption of soft drinks with sugar and unhealthy snacks in the same period; and inversely associated with change in vegetable consumption. Change in computer/game use was also inversely related to change in fruit consumption. An inverse but non-substantive association was found between change in TV/DVD use and change in leisure-time PA. Change in computer/game use was not significantly associated with change in leisure-time PA.

CONCLUSIONS:

Changes in screen-based SB were associated with multiple unfavorable changes in dietary habits, although the associations were weak. These associations need to be further investigated in intervention/experimental studies, to assess whether changing screen-based SB will result in clinically relevant changes in dietary behaviors. However, the findings of this study suggest that screen-based SB and leisure-time PA are largely independent behaviors which should be addressed separately in health promotion activities.

PMID:
23351357
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3560151
Free PMC Article
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