Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Folia Biol (Krakow). 2012;60(3-4):205-12.

Sex- and age-related changes of trabecular bone of tibia in growing domestic geese (Anser domesticus).

Author information

  • 1Vertebrates Morphology Department, University of Natural Sciences and Humanities in Siedlce, Konarskiego 2, 08-110 Siedlce, Poland. anna.charuta@neostrada.pl

Abstract

An analysis of radiological images of the spongious substance of the tibiotarsal bones in domestic goose (120 individuals) was performed for the first time. Based on radiographs obtained from radiological examinations conducted in the region of interest (80 x 90 mm2) of the proximal metaphysis, an analysis of the spongious substance of the tibia was performed with the Trabecula programme in order to construct a map of trabeculae and identify their number, volume and density. The results were evaluated statistically using two-way ANOVA. Changes in the number, volume and density of radiological trabeculae of the tibiotarsal bone (TB) in geese from 4 to 16 weeks old were observed. The lowest number (6.34 per mm2), volume (1.50% mm) and density (33.73%) of radiological trabeculae in the proximal metaphysis of TB was reported in male geese at the age of 6 weeks. Similar tendencies were observed in females as well. It should be noted that the volume and density of radiological trabeculae of the tibiotarsal bone achieved a maximum value in males 12 weeks of age, whereas in females at 8 weeks of age. An inverse relationship between body weight and the number of trabeculae in domestic geese (r = - 0.28; P < or = 0.05) was found. We also found a positive relationship between body weight and the volume of radiological trabeculae in domestic geese (r = 0.43; P < or = 0.05). During posthatching development, from the 4th week to slaughter maturity, a decrease in relative bone mass was observed. Negative changes in the trabecular structure combined with high weight gain could lead to bone deformities and locomotor problems in the studied geese.

PMID:
23342918
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk