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JAMA Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2013 Jan;139(1):21-7. doi: 10.1001/jamaoto.2013.1049.

Incidence of venous thromboembolism in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery.

Author information

  • 1Division of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, Penn State Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA 17033, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the incidence of venous thromboembolic disease in the otolaryngology-head and neck surgery (OTO-HNS) patient population.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS:

Review of medical records for all patients undergoing a surgical procedure during fiscal years 2008 to 2011 (July 1, 2008, through June 30, 2011) at an academic tertiary care medical center.

INTERVENTION:

A total of 59 884 total surgical procedures among all the surgical services.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

The incidence of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism.

RESULTS:

There were 5616 otolaryngology procedures performed during the study period. Clinically evident deep venous thrombosis developed in 3 patients; 2 of these patients also developed a pulmonary embolism. The overall incidence of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in OTO-HNS was 0.05% and 0.035%, respectively. All patients who developed deep venous thrombosis or a pulmonary embolism in the OTO-HNS population were inpatients being treated for cancer. There were no deep venous thromboses or pulmonary emboli in patients undergoing same-day or overnight surgery or in patients without an active cancer. The OTO-HNS service had significantly lower rates of venous thromboembolism than did most other surgical specialties despite lower rates of adherence to venous thromboembolism prophylaxis guidelines.

CONCLUSIONS:

The incidence of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism among the OTO-HNS patient population at our academic center is lower than the incidence reported in previous studies (range, 0.1%-0.3%) and is significantly lower than the incidence observed in other surgical specialties. It is likely that patient- and specialty-specific factors as well as the more aggressive use of venous thromboembolism prophylaxis during recent years are at least partially responsible for the decreased incidence in our population.

PMID:
23329088
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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