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Prehosp Emerg Care. 2013 Apr-Jun;17(2):162-9. doi: 10.3109/10903127.2012.749964. Epub 2013 Jan 17.

Muscles used for chest compression under static and transportation conditions.

Author information

  • 1Faculty of Health Science, Hiroshima International University, Hiroshima, Japan. yasuda-y@hs.hirokoku-u.ac.jp

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Unstable conditions during ambulance transportation are not conducive to the performance of high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation by emergency medical technicians.

OBJECTIVE:

The present study was conducted to clarify differences in the quality of chest compression and associated muscle activity between static and ambulance transportation conditions.

METHODS:

Nine paramedic students performed chest compression for 5 minutes on the floor and during ambulance transportation. Compression rate and depth and success and error rates of chest compression were determined using the Resusci Anne manikin with a PC SkillReporting System (Laerdal Medical). Integrated electromyography (i-EMG) values of eight different muscles were also recorded bilaterally during the first and last 30 seconds of compression.

RESULTS:

There was no significant difference in compression rate per minute (p = 0.232) and depth of chest compression (p = 0.174) between the two conditions. The success rate was significantly lower under the ambulance transportation condition than under the static condition (p = 0.0161). Compared with those under the static condition, the total i-EMG values were significantly lower for the multifidus (p = 0.0072) and biceps femoris (p < 0.0001) muscles and significantly higher for the deltoid (p = 0.0032), pectoralis major (p = 0.0037), triceps brachii (p = 0.0014), vastus lateralis (p < 0.0001), and gastrocnemius (p = 0.0004) muscles under the ambulance transportation condition.

CONCLUSIONS:

Chest compression is performed mainly through flexion and extension of the hip joint while kneeling on the floor and through the elbow and shoulder joints while standing in a moving ambulance. Therefore, the low quality of chest compression during ambulance transportation may be attributable to an altered technique of performing the procedure.

PMID:
23327531
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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