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Oncogene. 2014 Jan 16;33(3):347-57. doi: 10.1038/onc.2012.586. Epub 2013 Jan 14.

Next-generation sequencing of endoscopic biopsies identifies ARID1A as a tumor-suppressor gene in Barrett's esophagus.

Author information

  • 11] Department of Pathology, John Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD, USA [2] Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands [3] Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
  • 2Stanley Institute for Cognitive Genomics, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Woodbury, NY, USA.
  • 3Department of Pathology, John Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD, USA.
  • 4Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA.
  • 5Department of Medicine (Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology), John Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD, USA.
  • 61] Department of Pathology, John Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD, USA [2] Pathobiology Program, John Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD, USA.
  • 7Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
  • 81] Department of Pathology, John Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD, USA [2] Department of Oncology, John Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD, USA [3] Department of Genetic Medicine, John Hopkins Medical Institution, Baltimore, MD, USA.

Abstract

The incidence of Barrett's esophagus (BE)-associated esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is increasing. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) provides an unprecedented opportunity to uncover genomic alterations during BE pathogenesis and progression to EAC, but treatment-naive surgical specimens are scarce. The objective of this study was to establish the feasibility of using widely available endoscopic mucosal biopsies for successful NGS, using samples obtained from a BE 'progressor'. Paired-end whole-genome NGS was performed on the Illumina platform using libraries generated from mucosal biopsies of normal squamous epithelium (NSE), BE and EAC obtained from a patient who progressed to adenocarcinoma during endoscopic surveillance. Selective validation studies, including Sanger sequencing, immunohistochemistry and functional assays, were performed to confirm the NGS findings. NGS identified somatic nonsense mutations of AT-rich interactive domain 1A (SWI like) (ARID1A) and PPIE and an additional 37 missense mutations in BE and/or EAC, which were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. ARID1A mutations were detected in 15% (3/20) high-grade dysplasia (HGD)/EAC patients. Immunohistochemistry performed on an independent archival cohort demonstrated ARID1A protein loss in 0% (0/76), 4.9% (2/40), 14.3% (4/28), 16.0% (8/50) and 12.2% (12/98) of NSE, BE, low-grade dysplasia, HGD and EAC tissues, respectively, and was inversely associated with nuclear p53 accumulation (P=0.028). Enhanced cell growth, proliferation and invasion were observed on ARID1A knockdown in EAC cells. In addition, genes downstream of ARID1A that potentially contribute to the ARID1A knockdown phenotype were identified. Our studies establish the feasibility of using mucosal biopsies for NGS, which should enable the comparative analysis of larger 'progressor' versus 'non-progressor' cohorts. Further, we identify ARID1A as a novel tumor-suppressor gene in BE pathogenesis, reiterating the importance of aberrant chromatin in the metaplasia-dysplasia sequence.

PMID:
23318448
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3805724
Free PMC Article
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