Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Age (Dordr). 2013 Dec;35(6):2099-109. doi: 10.1007/s11357-012-9498-3. Epub 2013 Jan 15.

β1-Adrenergic receptor blockade extends the life span of Drosophila and long-lived mice.

Author information

  • 1Department of Biochemistry, University of California at Riverside, Riverside, CA, 92521, USA, spindler@ucr.edu.

Abstract

Chronic treatment with β-adrenergic receptor (βAR) agonists increases mortality and morbidity while βAR antagonists (β-blockers) decrease all-cause mortality for those at risk of cardiac disease. Levels of sympathetic nervous system βAR agonists and βAR activity increase with age, and this increase may hasten the development of age-related mortality. Here, we show that β-blockers extend the life span of healthy metazoans. The β-blockers metoprolol and nebivolol, administered in food daily beginning at 12 months of age, significantly increase the mean and median life span of isocalorically fed, male C3B6F1 mice, by 10 and 6.4%, respectively (P < 0.05). Neither drug affected the weight or food intake of the mice, indicating that induced CR is not responsible for these effects, and that energy absorption and utilization are not altered by the drugs. Both β-blockers were investigated to control for their idiosyncratic, off-target effects. Metoprolol and nebivolol extended Drosophila life span, without affecting food intake or locomotion. Thus, βAR antagonists are capable of directly extending the life span of two widely divergent metazoans, suggesting that these effects are phylogenetically highly conserved. Thus, long-term use of β-blockers, which are generally well-tolerated, may enhance the longevity of healthy humans.

PMID:
23314750
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3824994
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Springer Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk