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Exp Neurol. 2013 Mar;241:45-55. doi: 10.1016/j.expneurol.2012.12.009. Epub 2012 Dec 21.

Fingolimod reduces cerebral lymphocyte infiltration in experimental models of rodent intracerebral hemorrhage.

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  • 1Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA 92354, USA.

Abstract

T-lymphocytes promote cerebral inflammation, thus aggravating neuronal injury after stroke. Fingolimod, a sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor analog, prevents the egress of lymphocytes from primary and secondary lymphoid organs. Based on these findings, we hypothesized fingolimod treatment would reduce the number of T-lymphocytes migrating into the brain, thereby ameliorating cerebral inflammation following experimental intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). We investigated the effects of fingolimod in two well-established murine models of ICH, implementing intrastriatal infusions of either bacterial collagenase (cICH) or autologous blood (bICH). Furthermore, we tested the long term neurological improvements by Fingolimod in a collagenase-induced rat model of ICH. Fingolimod, in contrast to vehicle administration alone, improved neurological functions and reduced brain edema at 24 and 72 h following experimental ICH in CD-1 mice (n=103; p<0.05). Significantly fewer lymphocytes were found in blood and brain samples of treated animals when compared to the vehicle group (p<0.05). Moreover, fingolimod treatment significantly reduced the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), interferon-γ (INF-γ), and interleukin-17 (IL-17) in the mouse brain at 72 h post-cICH (p<0.05 compared to vehicle). Long-term neurocognitive performance and histopathological analysis were evaluated in Sprague-Dawley rats between 8 and 10 weeks post-cICH (n=28). Treated rats showed reduced spatial and motor learning deficits, along with significantly reduced brain atrophy and neuronal cell loss within the basal ganglia (p<0.05 compared to vehicle). We conclude that fingolimod treatment ameliorated cerebral inflammation, at least to some extent, by reducing the availability and subsequent brain infiltration of T-lymphocytes, which improved the short and long-term sequelae after experimental ICH in rodents.

Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
23261767
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3570752
Free PMC Article

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