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Int Immunopharmacol. 2013 Feb;15(2):289-95. doi: 10.1016/j.intimp.2012.12.003. Epub 2012 Dec 20.

CHP1002, a novel andrographolide derivative, inhibits pro-inflammatory inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 expressions in RAW264.7 macrophages via up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 expression.

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  • 1Department of Drug Evaluation, Beijing Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, 27 Taiping Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100850, PR China.

Abstract

Andrographolides, a type of diterpene lactone, are widely known to have anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties. CHP1002, a synthetic derivative of andrographolide, has similar anti-inflammatory action in mouse ear swelling test and rat paw edema test. In the present study, the mechanism of anti-inflammatory effects of CHP1002 was investigated in RAW264.7 macrophages. CHP1002 potently suppressed inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expressions in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. CHP1002 reduced the production of iNOS-derived nitric oxide (NO) and COX-2-derived prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). CHP1002 induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression via activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and NF-E2 related factor 2 transcription factor (Nrf2). Down-regulation of LPS-induced iNOS and COX-2 expressions was partially reversed by the HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP). In addition, CHP1002 significantly attenuated LPS-induced TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 production. CHP1002 effectively induced HO-1 and was capable of inhibiting some macrophage-derived pro-inflammatory mediators, which may be closely correlated with its anti-inflammatory action.

Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

PMID:
23261362
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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