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Neurochem Res. 2013 Mar;38(3):530-7. doi: 10.1007/s11064-012-0945-4. Epub 2012 Dec 18.

Propofol increases expression of basic fibroblast growth factor after transient cerebral ischemia in rats.

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  • 1Department of Anesthesiology, ShengJing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, China. zhaoxcstephen@yahoo.com

Abstract

Anesthetics such as propofol can provide neuroprotective effects against cerebral ischemia. However, the underlying mechanism of this beneficial effect is not clear. Therefore, we subjected male Sprague-Dawley rats to 2 h of middle cerebral artery occlusion and investigated how post-ischemic administration of propofol affected neurologic outcome and the expression of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). After 2 h of ischemia, just before reperfusion, the animals were randomly assigned to receive either propofol (20 mg kg(-1) h(-1)) or vehicle (10 % intralipid, 2 ml kg(-1) h(-1)) intravenously for 4 h. Neurologic scores, infarct volume, and brain water content were measured at different time points after reperfusion. mRNA level of bFGF was measured by real-time PCR, and the protein expression level of bFGF was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. At 6, 24, 72 h, and 7 days of reperfusion, infarct volume was significantly reduced in the propofol-treated group compared to that in the vehicle-treated group (all P < 0.05). Propofol post-treatment also attenuated brain water content at 24 and 72 h and reduced neurologic deficit score at 72 h and 7 days of reperfusion (all P < 0.05). Additionally, in the peri-infarct area, bFGF mRNA and protein expression were elevated at 6, 24, and 72 h of reperfusion compared to that in the vehicle-treated group (all P < 0.05). These results show that post-ischemic administration of propofol provides neural protection from cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. This protection may be related to an early increase in the expression of bFGF.

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