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J Clin Oncol. 2013 Jan 20;31(3):380-6. doi: 10.1200/JCO.2012.43.9570. Epub 2012 Dec 10.

Randomized controlled trial of a video decision support tool for cardiopulmonary resuscitation decision making in advanced cancer.

Author information

  • 1Massachusetts General Hospital, General Medicine Unit, 50 Staniford St, 9th Floor, Boston, MA 02114, USA. avolandes@partners.org

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Decision making regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is challenging. This study examined the effect of a video decision support tool on CPR preferences among patients with advanced cancer.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

We performed a randomized controlled trial of 150 patients with advanced cancer from four oncology centers. Participants in the control arm (n = 80) listened to a verbal narrative describing CPR and the likelihood of successful resuscitation. Participants in the intervention arm (n = 70) listened to the identical narrative and viewed a 3-minute video depicting a patient on a ventilator and CPR being performed on a simulated patient. The primary outcome was participants' preference for or against CPR measured immediately after exposure to either modality. Secondary outcomes were participants' knowledge of CPR (score range of 0 to 4, with higher score indicating more knowledge) and comfort with video.

RESULTS:

The mean age of participants was 62 years (standard deviation, 11 years); 49% were women, 44% were African American or Latino, and 47% had lung or colon cancer. After the verbal narrative, in the control arm, 38 participants (48%) wanted CPR, 41 (51%) wanted no CPR, and one (1%) was uncertain. In contrast, in the intervention arm, 14 participants (20%) wanted CPR, 55 (79%) wanted no CPR, and 1 (1%) was uncertain (unadjusted odds ratio, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.7 to 7.2; P < .001). Mean knowledge scores were higher in the intervention arm than in the control arm (3.3 ± 1.0 v 2.6 ± 1.3, respectively; P < .001), and 65 participants (93%) in the intervention arm were comfortable watching the video.

CONCLUSION:

Participants with advanced cancer who viewed a video of CPR were less likely to opt for CPR than those who listened to a verbal narrative.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01241929.

PMID:
23233708
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC4090424
Free PMC Article
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