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Trop Anim Health Prod. 2013 Apr;45(4):979-86. doi: 10.1007/s11250-012-0320-0. Epub 2012 Dec 5.

Prevalence of subclinical mastitis and isolated udder pathogens in dairy cows in Southern Vietnam.

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  • 1Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Reproduction, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden. karin.ostensson@slu.se

Abstract

Dairy production is not traditional in Vietnam. The farmers have little practical knowledge and udder health control is generally lacking. In order to give the farmers appropriate advice, knowledge about the distribution of udder pathogens is crucial. The aim of the study was to investigate the prevalence of sub-clinical mastitis and to identify udder pathogens isolated from smallholder dairy herds in Southern Vietnam. Twenty farms with a herd somatic cell count (SCC) ranging from low (≤ 400 × 10(3)cells/mL) to high (>400 × 10(3)cells/mL) were randomly selected. Milk samples were collected from 458 quarters of 115 clinically healthy cows. SCC was analyzed on farm by a portable cell counter. Bacteriological samples were taken using Mastistrip(©) cassettes and sent to Sweden for examination. For all herds the mean herd SCC was 632 × 10(3)/mL milk. The prevalence of subclinical mastitis at quarter SCC basis was 63.2 % and at cow basis 88.6 %. Only 40 % of all cows were bacteriologically negative in all quarters. Streptococcus agalactiae was the most commonly found bacteria species, isolated from 96 of the 458 quarter samples, in 13 of the 20 farms. The results indicate pronounced subclinical mastitis problems among the dairy cows in this region mainly due to infections with S. agalactiae. The high prevalence of this highly contagious pathogen is probably attributable to the generally poor milking hygiene and low awareness of proper measures to prevent occurrence and spread of udder infections. A strict, targeted action program for the herds in this area is required in order to lower the prevalence of subclinical mastitis.

PMID:
23212834
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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