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Int J Mol Sci. 2012 Nov 21;13(11):15464-74. doi: 10.3390/ijms131115464.

Associations between endogenous dimethylarginines and renal function in healthy children and adolescents.

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  • 1Almed-Elektra Medical Center, 41-710 Ruda Śląska, Poland. surdacki.andreas@gmx.net.

Abstract

The structural isomer of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA), is eliminated almost entirely by urinary excretion and considered a sensitive index of glomerular filtration rate (GFR). However, reports on this relationship in healthy subjects younger than 18 years of age are rare. Therefore, our aim was to investigate relations between endogenous dimethylarginines and renal function indices in healthy children and adolescents. We studied 40 subjects aged 3–18 years free of coexistent diseases or subclinical carotid atherosclerosis. A serum creatinine-derived estimated GFR (eGFR) was calculated by the revised bedside Schwartz equation. L-arginine, ADMA and SDMA were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Mean eGFR was 122 ± 22 (SD) mL/min per 1.73 m2. Creatinine and eGFR exhibited closer correlations with the SDMA/ADMA ratio (r = 0.64, p < 0.0001; r = −0.63, p < 0.0001, respectively) than with SDMA (r = 0.31, p = 0.05; r = −0.35, p = 0.03). Neither creatinine nor eGFR correlated with ADMA or L-arginine. Adjustment for age or height only slightly attenuated the associations between the SDMA/ADMA ratio and eGFR or creatinine. Our findings suggest the superiority of the SDMA/ADMA ratio over SDMA as a renal function index in healthy children. Thus, further studies are warranted to verify our preliminary results in a larger group of subjects below 18 years of age.

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