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Food Microbiol. 2013 Apr;33(2):197-204. doi: 10.1016/j.fm.2012.09.017. Epub 2012 Oct 6.

Modelling survival kinetics of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli O157:H7 on stainless steel surfaces soiled with different substrates under static conditions of temperature and relative humidity.

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  • 1Department of Food Science and Technology, International Campus of Excellence in the AgriFood Sector (CeIA3), University of Córdoba, Campus de Rabanales, C-1, 14014 Córdoba, Spain. b42perof@uco.es

Abstract

The survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Staphylococcus aureus on stainless steel surfaces with Saline Solution (SS), Tryptone Soy Broth (TSB) and meat purge was studied, and based on results, mathematical models describing survival of pathogens as a function of time were proposed. Results indicated that S. aureus was able to survive longer than E. coli O157:H7 in all substrates. The type of substrate had a greater impact on the survival of E. coli O157:H7. This microorganism only remained viable for 8 and 50 h (hours) on surfaces with SS and TSB, respectively while on meat purge, the microorganism could be recovered after 200 h. For S. aureus, SS and TSB led to similar survival times (250 h) whereas on meat purge, survival capacity increased to 800 h. Survival data for S. aureus could be well described by a log-linear model or a Weibull model depending on the type of substrate (R(2) > 0.85). E. coli O157:H7 displayed an evident tail zone which made the Weibull model more appropriate (R(2) > 0.94). These survival models may be used in quantitative risk assessment to produce more accurate risk estimates. Finally, the results highlight the importance of performing effective cleaning procedures to prevent cross contamination.

Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
23200652
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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