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Inj Prev. 2013 Aug;19(4):227-31. doi: 10.1136/injuryprev-2012-040594. Epub 2012 Nov 29.

Why more male pedestrians die in vehicle-pedestrian collisions than female pedestrians: a decompositional analysis.

Author information

  • 1Department of Epidemiology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506–9151, USA. mozhu@hsc.wvu.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Pedestrians account for a third of the 1.2 million traffic fatalities annually worldwide, and men are overrepresented. We examined the factors that contribute to this male-female discrepancy: walking exposure (kilometres walked per person-year), vehicle-pedestrian collision risk (number of collisions per kilometres walked) and vehicle-pedestrian collision case fatality rate (number of deaths per collision).

DESIGN:

The decomposition method quantifies the relative contributions (RCs) of individual factors to death rate ratios among groups. The male-female ratio of pedestrian death rates can be expressed as the product of three component ratios: walking exposure, collision risk and case fatality rate. Data sources included the 2008-2009 US Fatality Analysis Reporting System, General Estimates System, National Household Travel Survey and population estimates.

SETTING:

USA.

PARTICIPANTS:

Pedestrians aged 5 years and older.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Death rate per person-year, kilometres walked per person-year, collisions per kilometres walked and deaths per collision by sex.

RESULTS:

The pedestrian death rate per person-year for men was 2.3 times that for women. This ratio of male to female rates can be expressed as the product of three component ratios: 0.995 for walking exposure, 1.191 for collision risk and 1.976 for case fatality rate. The RCs of these components were 1%, 20% and 79%, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

The majority of the male-female discrepancy in 2008-2009 pedestrian deaths in the US is attributed to a higher fatality per collision rate among male pedestrians.

PMID:
23197672
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3715558
Free PMC Article
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