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Child Obes. 2012 Dec;8(6):533-41. doi: 10.1089/chi.2011.0098.

Changes in lipidemia during chronic care treatment of childhood obesity.

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  • 1Children’s Obesity Clinic, Department of Pediatrics, Copenhagen University Hospital Holbak, Holbak, Denmark.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Childhood obesity and related co-morbidities are increasing. This intervention study assessed the associations between weight changes and lipidemia in obese children and adolescents.

METHODS:

A total of 240 obese children and adolescents (median age, 11.3 years; range, 3.9-20.9) were enrolled in a best-practice multidisciplinary chronic care treatment program. The concentrations of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and triglycerides (TGs) and anthropometric data comprising height and weight were collected at baseline and after up to 39 months of continuous treatment.

RESULTS:

The BMI standard deviation score (SDS) decreased in 51% of patients and maintained unchanged in 32% of patients during the treatment. At baseline, 65 (27.1%) of the patients exhibited dyslipidemia defined as increased concentrations of total cholesterol (>200 mg/dL), LDL (>130 mg/dL), or TGs (>150 mg/dL), or decreased HDL concentration (<35 mg/dL). Dyslipidemia improved with weight loss; the odds ratio (OR) was 0.37 per BMI SDS (p = 0.014) after adjusting for age, sex, and baseline BMI SDS. Baseline TG concentration correlated positively and HDL concentration correlated negatively with baseline BMI SDS. Weight loss was associated with a decrease in the concentrations of total cholesterol (p = 0.0005), LDL (p < 0.0001), non-HDL (p < 0.0001), and TGs (p < 0.0001), and with an increase in HDL concentration (p < 0.0001).

CONCLUSION:

High lipid concentrations were associated with childhood obesity. The lipid profile improved during weight loss independently of the baseline BMI SDS and baseline lipid concentration.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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