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Vet Surg. 2013 Feb;42(2):170-5. doi: 10.1111/j.1532-950X.2012.01029.x. Epub 2012 Nov 26.

Microvascular free tissue transfer of the trapezius flap in 20 dogs and a wallaby.

Author information

  • 1Guardian Veterinary Centre, Edmonton, AB T6E 1V2, Canada. kurach@cvm.msu.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the feasibility, complications, and clinical outcome of consecutive free trapezius flap transfers in 20 dogs and a wallaby.

STUDY DESIGN:

Case series.

ANIMALS:

Dogs (n = 20) and 1 wallaby

METHODS:

Medical records of 20 dogs and 1 wallaby that had free trapezius flap transfers were evaluated retrospectively for indications, date of transfer, site of flap relocation, flap composition (myocutaneous, muscular, myoosseus), recipient artery and veins, flap ischemia times, surgery time, antithrombotic strategies used, intra- and postoperative complications related to the flap, hospitalization, in hospital duration after flap transfer, and outcome.

RESULTS:

Free flap transfers (16 muscle, 4 myocutaneous, 1 myoosseus) were used to treat traumatic soft tissue loss (13), neoplasm excision (2), osteomyelitis (4), and soft palate reconstruction (2); all flaps survived. Anti-thrombotic therapy was used in all cases although strategies varied. Postoperative complications were infrequent, generally of low severity, and primarily included donor site seroma formation and infection.

CONCLUSIONS:

Free trapezius flap was successfully used in 21 consecutive cases for a wide variety of reconstructive techniques with good, functional long-term outcome.

© Copyright 2012 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

PMID:
23181899
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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