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Neuropeptides. 2013 Jun;47(3):199-206. doi: 10.1016/j.npep.2012.10.005. Epub 2012 Nov 22.

Peripheral substance P and neurokinin-1 receptors have a role in inflammatory and neuropathic orofacial pain models.

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  • 1Department of Pharmacology, Federal University of Parana, Curitiba, PR, Brazil.

Abstract

There is accumulating evidence that substance P released from peripheral sensory neurons participates in inflammatory and neuropathic pain. In this study it was investigated the ability of substance P to induce orofacial nociception and thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia, as well as the role of NK1 receptors on models of orofacial inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Substance P injected into the upper lip at 1, 10 and 100 μg/50 μL failed to induce nociceptive behavior. Also, substance P (0.1-10 μg/50 μL) injected into the upper lip did not evoke orofacial cold hyperalgesia and when injected at 1 μg/50 μL did not induce mechanical hyperalgesia. However, substance P at this latter dose induced orofacial heat hyperalgesia, which was reduced by the pre-treatment of rats with a non-peptide NK1 receptor antagonist (SR140333B, 3mg/kg). Systemic treatment with SR140333B (3 mg/kg) also reduced carrageenan-induced heat hyperalgesia, but did not exert any influence on carrageenan-induced cold hyperalgesia. Blockade of NK1 receptors with SR140333B also reduced by about 50% both phases of the formalin response evaluated in the orofacial region. Moreover, heat, but not cold or mechanical, hyperalgesia induced by constriction of the infraorbital nerve, a model of trigeminal neuropathic pain, was abolished by pretreatment with SR140333B. Considering that substance P was peripherally injected (i.e. upper lip) and the NK1 antagonist used lacks the ability to cross the blood-brain-barrier, our results demonstrate that the peripheral SP/NK1 system participates in the heat hyperalgesia associated with inflammation or nerve injury and in the persistent pain evoked by formalin in the orofacial region.

Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
23177733
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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