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Alzheimers Dement. 2013 Mar;9(2):199-203. doi: 10.1016/j.jalz.2012.06.005. Epub 2012 Nov 16.

Amyloid imaging and cognitive decline in nondemented oldest-old: the 90+ Study.

Author information

  • 1Department of Neurology, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA. ckawas@uci.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The goal of this study was to examine cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between cognitive performance and beta amyloid (Aβ) load determined by florbetapir F18 positron emission tomography (PET) in nondemented oldest-old.

METHODS:

Thirteen nondemented (normal or cognitively impaired nondemented) participants (median age, 94.2 years) from The 90+ Study underwent florbetapir-PET scanning within 3 months of baseline neuropsychological testing. Amyloid load was measured with a semi-automated quantitative analysis of average cortical-to-cerebellar standardized uptake value ratio (SUVr) and a visual interpretation (Aβ- or Aβ+). Neuropsychological testing was repeated every 6 months.

RESULTS:

At baseline, SUVr correlated significantly with tests of global cognition and memory. During follow-up (median, 1.5 years), the Aβ+ group had steeper declines on most cognitive tests, particularly global cognitive measures.

CONCLUSION:

This preliminary study suggests that greater amyloid load is associated with poorer cognition and faster cognitive decline in nondemented oldest-old. Amyloid load may identify individuals at increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease.

Copyright © 2013 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
23164550
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3604036
Free PMC Article
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