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Surgeon. 2012 Dec;10(6):334-8. doi: 10.1016/j.surge.2011.08.006. Epub 2011 Oct 6.

A review of major trauma admissions to a tertiary adult referral hospital over a ten year period: fewer patients, similar survival.

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  • 1Department of Surgery, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. gemmasolon@gmail.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Trauma is an important cause for presentation to the emergency department, representing a significant number of emergency surgical admissions. Societal changes result in alterations in the epidemiology of trauma.

OBJECTIVES:

This study aimed to review patients admitted to a tertiary referral hospital as a result of traumatic injuries, assessing for changes in admission epidemiology.

METHODS:

Trauma admissions over two year-long periods a decade apart were reviewed. The Trauma Audit and Research Network (TARN) audit system identified admissions and transfers between June 2006 and May 2007. The Hospital In-Patient Enquiry (HIPE) system identified those fulfilling TARN criteria a decade earlier. Comparative analysis was performed on the dataset.

RESULTS:

There were 367 trauma admissions between June 2006 and May 2007: 88 road traffic accidents (RTAs), 201 falls and 77 other injuries, with 627 admissions a decade earlier: 286 RTAs, 247 falls and 94 others. Males comprised 72% and 69% of RTA admissions in both periods respectively. Firearm-related injuries increased significantly (p = 0.015). Neurosurgical transfers decreased from 256 to 150 with a slight increase in unadjusted overall mortality from 8.5% to 10.9%. Admissions of patients aged less than 19 reduced from 150 to 59 (p = 0.0031) with a similar trend in those aged between 20 and 29 years from 149 to 78.

CONCLUSION:

Admissions resulting from RTAs and of patients aged under 30 reduced significantly, however, young males remain the most affected sub-group. Firearm injuries increased significantly, a worrying trend in view of the severity of injury sustained by these victims.

Copyright © 2011 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
23141468
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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